Adventures in #Amazon algorithms part three: erotic romance in the Christian category


 

I’ve previously posted here and here about the challenges of publishing gay Amish romance on Amazon without being put in the Christian/inspirational categories, even though I pointedly do not choose these categories or keywords.

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Okay, it’s not that bad, but dealing with loopholes in Amazon’s system is an exercise in frustration for me and the service reps. After I uploaded  A Way Home, the third book in my gay Amish romance series, earlier this week, I immediately emailed KDP support to have the Christian categories removed. As usual, they were very quick to reply, which is one of the great things about Amazon — they are very responsive.

image1(1) image2Wow! Could it be that easy? Could it?

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More than a week later, I’m still rocking the Christian Books & Bibles category, inspirational romance, aaannnd gay erotica:

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One of these things is not like the others. But it’s the others that don’t belong. Last time it took weeks for Amazon’s tech teams to be able to override the system. I feel bad having to bug them about this, but I hate having misleading categories on my books. Ah, the mysteries of Amazon. I shall continue to battle the beast…

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So many real, raw emotions in gay Amish romance


 

Gay Amish romanceBoy Meets Boy Reviews rave about A Way Home, the end of the gay Amish romance trilogy:

And that…is what I love so much about Isaac and David. They’re so good… But it’s not fake or forced, because of their background and their families, it only makes sense that this is who they are. They’re not stereotypical perfectly perfect characters. They make mistakes and mess up (book 2, anyone?), but they know how to be gracious and humble. I simply adore them.

I had so many real, raw emotions while reading A Way Home. These boys have struck a chord with me and I’ll be sure to revisit them.

Buy now:
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Give to an LGBTQ cause and win free books! #bethechange #pushback


 

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I’m thrilled to be part of this initiative to support LGBTQ charities! Here’s what it’s all about:

224 authors, review bloggers, and publishers have got together to offer something wonderful: a reward for people who do a little bit to give back to charity. Instead of spending $5 on a book in the next two weeks, give that $5 to an LGBT charity of your choice, tell us about it in the comments, and go into the draw to win a book from one of our participating donors. And because it’s not all about money, if you can’t make a donation then please take a moment to share a charity’s links and tell us about that instead.

Three fundraisers have been set up to counter the hateful effects of Indiana’s SB 101. #Pizza4Equality is aiming to match the money raised by *that* pizza parlor, with all donations going to Cyndi Lauper’s True Colors Fund. Another fundraiser is aiming to raise $100,000 for Indiana Youth Group. Finally, Planting Peace is trying to raise $100,000 to provide beds for homeless LGBT people.

Please consider giving to one of these deserving fundraisers, or any other LGBT charity anywhere in the world. We’re not telling you where you should donate your time and money, only asking that you do. The smallest things can make the biggest difference, and together, we can do something incredible.

The Rafflecopter entry is here (at the bottom of the post). Give to charity and enter to win some awesome books!

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Gay Jack & the Beanstalk is “everything you’d expect a fairy tale to be: magical, mystical, romantic”


 

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What happens when Jack meets a sexy man atop that beanstalk?

4.5 stars for gay fairy tale Rise from The Novel Approach:

[T]hough different in scope from the original, [it] still symbolizes the rise of a poor man from his lowly state. This time, however, Jack and his “giant” become all the richer for having found the love of a lifetime.

[T]he authors pull out all the stops in the romance, playing on our emotions and our hopes for that aforementioned happy ending despite what seems to be poor odds. Rise is everything you’d expect a fairy tale to be: magical, mystical, romantic, and it’s well written to boot. I was enchanted, start to finish…

Buy or borrow now at Amazon

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How does the gay Amish trilogy conclude? “The ending was exactly what I wanted”


 

Gay Amish romanceLove Bytes Reviews gives 5 stars for the end of the gay Amish trilogy, A Way Home:

Lots of tears and angst. I loved it! That sounds so bad, but I did! I won’t give any more away, I’ll just say the ending was exactly what I wanted…

Keira’s writing is fantastic, her understanding of this community spot on. At least I assume it is; it felt like it! Her characters are great, well-developed after three books, and we saw all of them in this book. I liked the plot, it was nice and dramatic, and wasn’t easy or perfect for the characters. It seemed realistic to me. I can see this drama happening.

Buy now:
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Do you imagine actors as the characters in your mind when you read?


 

When I read, I always imagine the story playing out like a movie in my mind. I even cast actors for the roles, and sometimes I’ll pause and imagine the layout of a room and decorate it so I can see it very clearly. This might be why I’m such a slow reader! I guess I like to see every detail.

The first book I can remember casting was Dark Angel by V.C. Andrews. The mysterious and dreamy Uncle Troy was 21 Jump Street-era Johnny Depp in my young mind. Those cheekbones! (And lord, that poufy ’80s hair!)

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Click here to read the rest of my guest post at The Novel Approach, and see which actors inspired the characters in my gay Amish romance series.

Plus, do you like free books?

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I thought so! Make sure you comment on my post at TNA for a chance to win a free ebook from my backlist. Good luck!

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Gay Amish trilogy has “wonderful end” and a love “so strong and clear”


 

Gay Amish romanceJoyfully Jay highly recommends the end to the gay Amish trilogy, A Way Home:

A Way Home is the final book in Keira Andrew’s fabulous Gay Amish trilogy and it is a wonderful end to an amazing series. This story gave me everything I was looking for in a final book. We get a swift resolution to David and Isaac’s prior issues and see the men able to lean on each other for support. They are so clearly deeply in love and I was happy to see that the conflicts between them were not dragged out too far into this story. Instead, we see that the men are able to be a true source of support for one another and the love between them is so strong and clear.

The first book, A Forbidden Rumspringa, really took the m/m romance world by storm and I think launched Andrews into a whole new level of “must read” author.

Buy now:
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Should authors use pen names?


 

In the olden days before the Internet, the fact that some authors used pen names rarely seemed to be questioned. But in the digital age of social media, lines are being increasingly blurred, and some folks are wondering whether or not a pen name is necessary.

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Kristen Lamb recently posted about it, and Heidi Cullinan then shared her largely opposing thoughts. I definitely agree with Heidi that it’s a personal decision and not one that should be judged by anyone, and I think using terms such as “Crazyville” don’t help make a potentially touchy subject less contentious.

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I also think Lamb’s assertion that “95% of the time” it’s unnecessary is, well, wrong. She raises some great points for new authors to consider, but it’s couched in rather dismissive judginess that unfortunately doesn’t do anyone any favours.

I use a pen name for the simple reason that when I started publishing in 2006 I still had a day job (and I only gave that up in 2013), and I didn’t want a potential employer judging me for writing erotic m/m romance novels. Because some people do judge, whether you want to accept it or not. For me, separation of church and state just made sense. And at this point, I have brand equity in this pen name, and no desire to change it.

I’m also rather puzzled by this:

You will probably have to look into the legal aspects of using another name and will likely require a DBA (Doing Business As) because, if you have any amount of success, you will need to be able to cash the check under another name, do taxes, etc.

It does me no good to use the pen name Fifi Fluffernutter because I want to hide that I write erotica, but then someone goes to buy a book and can only make out the check to Kristen Lamb.

Er…what?

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1. Publishers and book sellers (Amazon, B&N et al.) have an author’s legal name and payment info. I get paid via check or direct deposit into my bank account. No one pays “Keira Andrews.”

2. I don’t do taxes as Keira Andrews. I claim my writing income on my tax return filed under my real name, just like any other self-employed person would claim their income from whatever goods or services they sell. My pen name is irrelevant.

3. Not sure where or how Kristen buys her erotica, but no one who buys my books writes a check to me! :)

I’ve never found it difficult to be myself on social media or my blog, and having a pen name is really not that hard, honestly. Now, having *two* pen names is definitely more of a pain (although often necessary when writing in two very different genres, or for any number of reasons). When I wrote my YA book, I used a different name since it wasn’t erotic and was aimed at teens. But I didn’t last long blogging and using social media as K.P. Kincaid, and now that the book is out of print, I’m going to revise it and make it new adult so I can publish as Keira Andrews. (The characters are 18 and 19 anyway, so it really will only be a matter of making some tweaks and adding in more sex. Since I love sex, that isn’t a problem!)

But overall, having a pen name hasn’t been a challenge or a hindrance to me, and if an author wants to–or needs to–use one for any reason they deem necessary, I say go for it. I don’t see that it’s anyone else’s place to judge.

What do you think about pen names? Let me know!

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Can gay Amish men in love find a place to call home?


 

It’s release day for the final book in my gay Amish romance trilogy! Thanks so much to everyone for your support and enthusiasm for these stories. Today I’m feeling this:

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And a little bit of this:

tumblr_m6z56r4tTZ1r66us2Annnd this:

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So, you know. The usual on release day. I really hope you’ll enjoy the end of David and Isaac’s trilogy. However, it’s not likely to be the end-end. They keep talking to me about where they’ll end up down the road, and I have a plot bunny for a fourth book that I’d write next year. But in the meantime, I hope this is a satisfying conclusion to their struggle to come out and find a place together in the world.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00067]Will returning to their Amish roots renew their faith in each other?

Isaac and David never thought they’d go back to the Amish world. But when Isaac’s younger brother is stricken with cancer, they don’t hesitate to return. Their relationship is on the rocks after insecurity and fear drove a wedge between them in San Francisco, and David is determined to make things right. Yet if they thought navigating “English” life was confusing, being back in Zebulon is even more complicated.

Their families are desperate to bring them back into the fold, and pressure from the community builds. Isaac and David yearn for a future together, but each day it becomes harder to hide the truth about who they really are. They’re caught between two worlds, and if they’re not careful it could tear them further apart.

Can Isaac and David make their way back to each other—and find a place to call home?

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Save 40% on this story of forbidden Amish love


 

To celebrate the release on April 8 of A Way Home, the final chapter in the gay Amish romance trilogy, I’m offering 40% off the first book. You can buy A Forbidden Rumspringa now for only $2.99!

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a-forbidden-rumspringa-web-copyWhen two young Amish men find love, will they risk losing everything?

In a world where every detail of life—down to the width of a hat brim—is dictated by God and the all-powerful rules of the community, two men dare to imagine a different way. At 18, Isaac Byler knows little outside the strict Amish settlement of Zebulon, Minnesota, where there is no rumspringa for exploration beyond the boundaries of their insular world. Isaac knows he’ll have to officially join the church and find a wife before too long, but he yearns for something else—something he can’t name.

Dark tragedy has left carpenter David Lantz alone to support his mother and sisters, and he can’t put off joining the church any longer. But when he takes on Isaac as an apprentice, their attraction grows amid the sweat and sawdust. David shares his sinful secrets, and he and Isaac struggle to reconcile their shocking desires with their commitment to faith, family and community.

Now that they’ve found each other, are they willing to lose it all?

Limited time! Buy now for only $2.99:

Amazon
All Romance

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